2021 In Plain Sight: Human Trafficking for Health Care Providers [IEM-X]
This course is for participants who are not part of the Baylor Scott & White Health Care System.  If you are affiliated with Baylor Scott & White please log in to PeoplePlace Learn to participate in the course.
Category
  • Ethics
  • Human Trafficking
Format
  • Self-study / Enduring
Credits
  • American Board of Internal Medicine (ABIM) MOC Part 2
  • American Board of Pediatrics (ABP) MOC
  • AMA PRA Category 1 Credit
  • ANCC
  • Attendance
  • Texas State Board of Social Work Examiners
The acute respiratory distress syndrome
Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a prevalent cause of acute respiratory failure with high rates of mortality, as well as short- and long-term complications, such as physical and cognitive impairment. Therefore, early recognition of this syndrome and application of well-demonstrated therapeutic interventions are essential to change the natural course of this entity and bring about positive clinical outcomes. In this article, we review updated concepts in ARDS. Specifically, we discuss the current definition of ARDS, its risk factors, and the evidence supporting ventilation management, adjunctive therapies, and interventions required in refractory hypoxemia. Please click here to subscribe to BUMC Proceedings
Category
  • BUMC Proceedings
Format
  • Journal
Credits
  • American Board of Internal Medicine (ABIM) MOC Part 2
  • AMA PRA Category 1 Credit
  • Attendance
Management dilemmas in restarting anticoagulation after gastrointestinal bleeding
Systemic anticoagulants are widely prescribed to prevent and treat thromboembolism, among other indications. A common com-plication of using these agents is gastrointestinal bleeding. While early resumption of anticoagulants after the bleeding has resolved can increase the risk of rebleeding, delayed resumption puts the patient at increased risk of thromboembolic events and mortality. There is limited data on this topic to guide clinicians on resuming anticoagulation after hospitalization for gastrointestinal bleeding and to educate patients regarding the subsequent risks of recurrent gastrointestinal bleeding, thromboembolism, and mortality. The optimal time to resume anticoagulation is also unknown. This review summarizes the existing literature and available data on the commonly encountered dilemma of restarting anticoagulation therapy after hospitalization for gastrointestinal bleeding.
Category
  • BUMC Proceedings
Format
  • Journal
Credits
  • American Board of Internal Medicine (ABIM) MOC Part 2
  • AMA PRA Category 1 Credit
  • Attendance

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