Antibody tests for COVID-19
The SARS-CoV-2 virus caused a globally growing pandemic call coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) that has disrupted  social, political, and medical environments around the world. Nations are assessing ways to reopen businesses while trying to balance health care risks and economic  fallouts. Strategies involving antibody testing have been proposed before phased reopening of the economy. Therefore, assessing the sensitivity and specificity of antibody tests for SARS-CoV-2 detect the presence of IgA, IgM, or IgG antibodies produced by B cells. Please click here to subscribe to BUMC Proceedings
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  • BUMC Proceedings
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Credits
  • American Board of Internal Medicine (ABIM) MOC Part 2 Medical Knowledge
  • AMA PRA Category 1 Credit
  • Attendance
The acute respiratory distress syndrome
Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a prevalent cause of acute respiratory failure with high rates of mortality, as well as short- and long-term complications, such as physical and cognitive impairment. Therefore, early recognition of this syndrome and application of well-demonstrated therapeutic interventions are essential to change the natural course of this entity and bring about positive clinical outcomes. In this article, we review updated concepts in ARDS. Specifically, we discuss the current definition of ARDS, its risk factors, and the evidence supporting ventilation management, adjunctive therapies, and interventions required in refractory hypoxemia. Please click here to subscribe to BUMC Proceedings
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  • BUMC Proceedings
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  • Journal
Credits
  • American Board of Internal Medicine (ABIM) MOC Part 2 Medical Knowledge
  • AMA PRA Category 1 Credit
  • Attendance
Advanced heart failure with reduced ejection fraction
Patients suffering advanced heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF) account for a large portion of patients admitted to hospitals worldwide. Mortality and 30-day readmission rates for HFrEF are now a focus of value-based payment models, making management of this disease a priority for hospitals, physicians, and payers alike. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors have been the cornerstone of therapy for decades. However, with treatment, the prognosis for patients with advanced HFrEF remains poor. Fortunately, advances in medical therapy and mechanical support offer some patients improvement in both survival and quality of life. We review advances in short- and long-term mechanical support and explore changes to organ allocation for cardiac transplantation. In addition, we provide a guide to facilitate appropriate referral to an advanced heart failure team.
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  • BUMC Proceedings
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  • Journal
Credits
  • American Board of Internal Medicine (ABIM) MOC Part 2 Medical Knowledge
  • AMA PRA Category 1 Credit
  • Attendance
Quality improvement initiative for pain management in primary care
In the context of both chronic pain and opioid crises, this large-system quality improvement project sought to increase use of evidence-based multimodal pain management strategies.  Primary care providers (PCPs) in internal medicine and family medicine identified as above- median prescribers of 3
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  • BUMC Proceedings
Format
  • Journal
Credits
  • American Board of Internal Medicine (ABIM) MOC Part 2 Medical Knowledge
  • AMA PRA Category 1 Credit
  • Attendance
Role of endothelial cell receptors in the context of SARS-CoV-2 infections (COVID-19)
Endothelial cell (EC) dysfunction contributes to COVID-19–associated vascular inflammation and coagulopathy, and the angioten-sin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) receptor plays a role in EC dysfunction in COVID-19. To expand the understanding of the role of the ACE2 receptor relative to EC dysfunction, this review addresses (1) tissue distribution of the ACE2 protein and its mRNA expression in humans, (2) susceptibility of the capillary ECs to SARS-CoV-2 infection, and (3) the role of EC dysfunction relevant to ACE2 and nuclear factor-jB in COVID-19.
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  • BUMC Proceedings
Format
  • Journal
Credits
  • American Board of Internal Medicine (ABIM) MOC Part 2 Medical Knowledge
  • AMA PRA Category 1 Credit
  • Attendance
Uterus transplantation—questions and answers about the procedure that is expanding the field of solid organ transplantation
Uterus transplant is a new and rapidly evolving field of solid organ transplantation designed to help women with absolute uterine-factor infertility who desire to carry their own pregnancies. The advent of this procedure and human clinical trials of uterus transplantation have raised technical, clinical, and ethical questions. We address several questions about uterus transplantation based on available literature and the clinical experience at Baylor University Medical Center, which has the largest uterus transplant program in the United States.
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  • BUMC Proceedings
Format
  • Journal
Credits
  • American Board of Internal Medicine (ABIM) MOC Part 2 Medical Knowledge
  • AMA PRA Category 1 Credit
  • Attendance
Pathobiology and evolving therapies of coronary artery vasospasm
AbstractCoronary artery vasospasm is a known cause of chest pain and requires a high level of clinical suspicion for diagnosis. It also remains in the differential diagnosis for patients presenting with Type 2 Myocardial Infarction.
Category
  • BUMC Proceedings
Format
  • Journal
Credits
  • American Board of Internal Medicine (ABIM) MOC Part 2 Medical Knowledge
  • AMA PRA Category 1 Credit
  • Attendance
Evidence-based approach to early outpatient treatment of SARS-CoV-2 (COVID-19) infection
Misinformation and promotion of well-intended but disproved therapies for COVID-19 have plagued evidence-based shared decision-making throughout the COVID-19 pandemic. In times of crisis, clinicians may feel that their strong inclination to prescribe potentially harmful, unproven therapies on behalf of their patients is supported by beneficence. Clinicians should mindfully identify and avoid commission bias during this pandemic, especially as more data have accumulated to assist with clinically sound decision-making. We describe a more evidence-based approach to treatment of early outpatient COVID-19, stressing the availability of Food and Drug Administration emergency use authorization therapies and considering plausibly beneficial, nonprescription supplements that are generally regarded as safe.
Category
  • BUMC Proceedings
Format
  • Journal
Credits
  • American Board of Internal Medicine (ABIM) MOC Part 2 Medical Knowledge
  • AMA PRA Category 1 Credit
  • Attendance
Post-acute sequelae of COVID-19 in adults referred to COVID recovery clinic services in an integrated health system in Texas
The epidemiology and organ-specific sequelae following acute illness due to COVID-19 and prompting patients to seek COVID recovery care are not yet well characterized. This cross-sectional study reviewed data on 200 adult patients with prolonged symptoms of COVID-19 (>14 days after symptom onset) not resolved by usual primary care or specialist care who were referred for COVID-specific follow-up. Most patients sought COVID recovery clinic visits within the first 2 months of initial onset of symptoms (median 37 days), with some seeking care for sequelae persisting up to 10 months (median 82 days). At the time of telehealth evaluation, 13% of patients were using home oxygen, and 10% of patients had been unable to return to work due to persistent fatigue and/or subjective cognitive dysfunction (“brain fog”). The prominent specific symptom sequelae prompting patients to seek COVID-specific evaluation beyond usual primary care and specialist referrals were dyspnea, fatigue/weakness, and subjective cognitive dysfunction, irrespective of whether patients had required hospitalization or of time since COVID-19 symptom onset.
Category
  • BUMC Proceedings
Format
  • Journal
Credits
  • American Board of Internal Medicine (ABIM) MOC Part 2 Medical Knowledge
  • AMA PRA Category 1 Credit
  • Attendance